Parallel Sessions

European Congress on Personalised Medicine, Belfast 2017

quill

Personalising Your Health: A Global Imperative!

27 November

Horizontal Sessions – 14.15 – 16.30


Incentiving Innovation: Changing the mindset (Debate)

Session Organiser: Gordon McVie King’s College London
Richard Sullivan Director of the Institute of Cancer Policy and KHP Integrated Cancer Centre, King’s College Lond

The challenges to be overcome in developing personalised medicine are numerous and difficult. They include the wide heterogeneity of disease, a lack of predictive biomarkers, clinical designs and regulatory processes that are outdated, the determination among public authorities to contain healthcare spending, and the inadequate incentives for companies. Only a shift in mindset among the stakeholder communities can overcome these challenges.

Benefit and risk need to be evaluated on the basis of real life data, and economic models will need to evolve to provide incentives for innovation with patients, policy makers and media as active participants in the process. Dialogue and collaboration will be necessary between regulators, payers, industry, researchers, patients and healthcare systems. It is no longer inconceivable, for instance, that payers could play a bigger role in participation in research projects. This session will deal with the different element, present case studies from the regional/national level and propose recommendations. There will be a cross-sectional debate including leading patient representatives and policy makers.


The Discovery Network

Session Organiser: Peter Kaptein
Inspire2Live

The crucial question that must be answered is ‘How can we get cancer under control faster?’ A key aspect of this goal is that we will have to be more efficient in translating new basic insights into more effective therapeutic regimen.

This session will discuss the different elements from a regional, national, international and disease perspective.


Personalizing treatment of blood diseases –  Taking advantage of the leukemia/lymphoma genome

Session Organiser: Ulrich Jäger
Professor of Haematology Division, Medical University of Vienna
Advances in the field of hematology have paved the way to precision medicine in many areas and are essential for development of personalized treatment.  Novel drugs building on the knowledge of the origin of blood disease have changed the prognosis of many patients. The session will  Personalized diagnostics and treatment of leukemia/lymphoma
The objective of the session will be to:
Outline the latest discoveries on underlying genetic defects in leukemia/lymphoma
Explain the translation of laboratory results to patient treatment


Mini-symposium Breast Cancer: Dealing with Complexity Head on to Better Personalised Treatment

Session Organiser: Liam Gallagher
Professor, School of Biomolecular & Biomed Science, Conway Institute
Breast cancer has been the classic ‘test bed’ for personalised medicine within the oncology field, stemming from early work in the hormone and growth factor receptor arenas. Indeed, the use of molecular diagnostics has become quite pervasive in the management of this complex disease. In the setting of early stage breast cancer, a selection of multi-gene expression assays aiding in the assessment of risk of recurrence are now in the marketplace and the clinic. Such tools are also being combined with classical clinicopathological factors to yield improved performance. Critically, multiple studies have now demonstrated clear impacts on clinician decision making, with these solutions also being shown to have significant benefits in terms of cost effectiveness. In the context of familial breast cancer, a wealth of disease predisposition genes have now been identified through significant cross-country collaborations, while in the case of sporadic breast cancer, a comprehensive picture is now in place in terms of the mutational spectrum underlying the disease. Some critical hurdles are starting to be overcome in terms of effective use of multi-gene panel testing in the clinic, both in the context of familial and sporadic breast cancer. There is also much greater interest in taking advantage of dynamic biomarkers obtained during the treatment course of breast cancer patients, such as that afforded by circulating tumour DNA or imaging approaches. Currently, the key challenge emerging in the breast cancer field is how to effectively manage the wealth of therapeutic and diagnostic options emerging, now at pace. A new paradigm is required in which this complexity will require the development and utilisation of computational and other tools to aid multi-disciplinary teams make the optimal choices of individual breast cancer patients.


A whole system approach to personalised medicine and health

Session Organiser: Michael Paul Messenger
Principal Healthcare Scientist, Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology
Gianni D’Errico
Regional Foundation for the Biomedical Research

In 2017, UK Health and Care providers face the most significant financial challenges for a generation. We know that we must keep innovating and improving if we are to meet the needs of our population in a tough economic climate. Personalised Medicine presents an opportunity for us to redesign the way in which we deliver health and care, moving to a future paradigm where advances in technology, information and evidence enable more accurate, timely, tailored and participatory health and care decisions to be made. Leading to better actions, improved outcomes and more effective use of our limited resources. The concept of Personalised Health expands this approach beyond medicine to include health and wellbeing, increasing the focus on prevention, early diagnosis and influencing lifestyles, with the aim of improving overall quality of life and longevity, whilst reducing health inequalities and the burden of disease. There is a significant opportunity to reposition and develop personalised technologies to transform management of public health, community and primary care populations.

The City of Leeds is embracing this vision and in this session we will hear, through a series of case studies and a panel discussion, how the “Leeds Centre for Personalised Medicine and Health” has brought together the whole health and care ecosystem to match excellence in science and innovation, with patient and population needs.

The session will discuss the different elements from a regional, national, international and disease perspective.


Oral Abstract Sessions

Oral Abstract Sessions include didactic presentations of abstracts representing important clinical and translational research findings and policy, regulatory developments by topic category. Presenting authors may use PowerPoint slides to accompany their oral presentation. Experts in the field (discussants) are chosen to provide comprehensive themed discussions of the findings from predetermined abstracts.

Poster and Poster Discussion Sessions

Abstracts displayed in poster format; select posters will be chosen for Poster Discussion Sessions where expert discussants will highlight the most clinically applicable and novel posters, with abstract authors participating as panel members. These sessions will be followed by networking with discussants and authors.

28 November

Horizontal Session – 11.00 – 12.45


Elixir of Health: Data –Realizing its potential in healthcare systems

Session Organiser: Dr Serena Scollen
Head of Human Genomics and Translational Data, ELIXIR
In the field of human genomics the challenges are shifting away from data generation and towards data management, analysis, access to compute and translation. To address this, ELIXIR is establishing a sustainable infrastructure for Human Genomics and Translational Data in Europe, establishing solutions to support data access and sharing. For example, we are collaborating with GA4GH on projects to enable discovery and access to genomic data from multiple countries and institutions (Beacons). ELIXIR will implement Beacons in the European Genome-phenome Archive and genomics resources in ELIXIR Nodes with individual-level data from biomedical research projects, supporting a three-level access system. Other examples include ‘Local EGA’, which facilitates national institutions to establish data storage facilities akin to the European Genome-phenome Archive and harmonized metadata; a study to assess long term management of translational and biomolecular data (IMI OncoTrack) and development and integration of IT infrastructure for translational research (TraIT). These projects include authentication and authorization solutions to support secure data access compliant with original consent agreements.

These solutions aim to enable researchers from all sectors to take full advantage of the potential and value of data, resulting in scientific discoveries and translation to medicine globally. This session will discuss the enablers and barriers to this area.


Genomics and Medicine – Crossing the Rubicon

Session Organiser: Sir John Burn
University of Newcastle – Cancer Prevent trials
It is forty years since “Genomics” entered scientific consciousness as the name for a new journal linking study of genetic traits to the “big picture” then provided by chromosome analysis. The term is now used to embrace the multi-omic approach including, sequence, transcripts, variants, metabolites and more. Predictions of an imminent dramatic impact on medicine have proved optimistic but are now becoming reality. The emergence of effective drugs for molecular subtypes of cancer and other disorders and the potential for economically viable treatments for rare diseases are driving the adjectives “personalised” and “precision” into routine use. The technological hurdles are falling to expose new barriers in data management and variant classification. The potential for more effective pathological diagnosis, simplifies prenatal diagnosis, gene editing and cancer vaccines will ensure Genomic Medicine remains centre stage. This session will chart an illustrated path through this new landscape.


Eyes do not lie – you are what you can see! Options for personalised medicine in eye diseases – A centre of Experimental Medicine (CEM)

Session Organiser: Alan Stitt
Dean of Innovation & Impact McCauley Chair of Experimental Ophthalmology, Queen’s University Belfast
The main objective of this session is to discuss how personalised diet, lifestyle and drug interventions combined with genetic background interact with disease onset, progression and response to treatment – how the eyes can tell it all.  By the end of the session we will have convinced the audience, that it is imperative that we understand how to tailor our advice when seeing patients with eye diseases as now several factors are known to affect eye disease so personalised medicine is viable once the correct information is gathered and analysed in the appropriate way. Some of the surprising angles, such as gut microbiota and its influence on us as humans, and on eye disease formation will be covered as well where emerging evidence is strong enough now to discuss.

There is a growing body of knowledge and evidence about how eye diseases reflect not only our general health and diet but also our lifestyle and genetic make-up. With the ageing population, age related diseases are becoming more prevalent but also, our desire to provide the best possible vehicle for healthy aging and when required, appropriate care at the right time to each patients grows as well. Without understanding how a particular person’s disease is affected by their genetic make-up and the environmental factors they face during their lifetime, it will not be possible to fulfil the 4 P’s of  personalised medicine: preventative, predictive, personalised and participatory. Using the examples of age related macular degeneration, diabetes, myopia and glaucoma, we will dissect the evidence for personalised medicine and will discuss how these will interact with medications taken for other diseases as well: can we generate progression in one disease by curing another?


Cancer Core Europe: getting to the core of the personalised/precision medicine agenda

Session Organiser: Fabien Calvo
Chief Scientific Officer, Cancer Core Europe
Cancer Core Europe, a consortium of six European cancer research institutes, brings together Gustave Roussy, Cambridge Cancer Center, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Karolinska Institutet, and DKFZ-NCT Heidelberg, to build a common infrastructure paving the way for a multi-site cancer institute.

Cancer Core Europe will accelerate the development of personalized medicine and immunotherapy through innovation and research, by sharing genomic, clinical, and imaging data and running cutting-edge early phase clinical trials with harmonized procedures across all six centers. Dedicated task forces are sharing best practices and leading collaborative projects that are already underway. In the future, Cancer Core Europe will open to include new European cancer centers promoting access to innovative personalized medicine throughout the continent.


Converting Hospitals to a Personalised Health Agenda

Session Organiser: Pascal Garel
Chief Executive, European Hospital and Healthcare Federation (HOPE)
Objective: Many European hospitals have already begun to define what personalised medicine means to their hospital and have developed their strategies for implementation. And as hospitals solidify their definition and vision of personalised medicine as well as their approach for implementation to create a culture of customised healthcare, leading practices will continue to emerge.

Just as doctors will no longer be able to apply the same forms of treatment to patients, hospitals will not be able to apply the same approach to addressing the challenges brought on by personalised medicine. Hospitals and providers have many options for how they respond to the changing market.

Relevance: The dawn of personalised medicine brings not only new advances to our healthcare system today, but also key challenges. This new science has led many participants in the healthcare industry, such as providers, to consider how best to adapt to these challenges and foster a consumer-focused culture. Hospitals have a clear opportunity to adapt to the new healthcare paradigm and provide services that are targeted to the individual patient. It is important to recognise, however, that different hospitals operate and require different models.


Horizontal Session – 14.30 – 16.15


Enabling Genomic Innovation by supporting human genomics and translational data discovery, access and sharing to impact global medicine and personalised healthcare

Session Organiser: Ewan Birney
Chair Global Alliance for Health
Dr Serena Scollen
Head of Human Genomics and Translational Data, Elixir
Genotypic and phenotypic data underpins all aspects of personalised medicine. Our objective is to demonstrate and discuss value of data re-use and infrastructure (for findable, accessible, interoperable and re-useable data) to support research and health applications. The session will address the following elements through a cross section of stakeholders.

1. Knowledge exchange: ELIXIR and EBI services, Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) for example the European Genome-Phenome Archive and the Beacon project
2. Raising awareness of the existing global and European Initiatives to share data and set standards to reduce fragmentation and build a path towards open public standards


Making the most out of innovation in Personalised Medicine: A EU strategy for more timely and affordable patient access

Session Organiser: Stanimir Hasardzhiev
Chair of the Bulgarian National Patients’ Organisation
Patient access to innovative PM technology and services is highly suboptimal and varies dramatically between EU member states. The fact that a new medicine or innovative product can sometimes take as long as 20 years or more to get from bench to bedside is not only clearly undesirable but is arguably unacceptable in the 21st century. And even after all those years of translation, patient access in the absence of flexible pricing and reimbursement systems is frequently restricted to patient subgroups and often further delayed or not affordable in less affluent parts of Europe.

If the potential of PM is to be realized, changes will be necessary in the way medicines are developed, regulated, assessed and rewarded. It is necessary to make policymakers and payers realize that investing now in these advanced therapies and technologies for PM as well as in adequate regulatory and payer decision making frameworks will be a key pre-requisite to see the long-term, cost-effective patient outcome benefits and more efficient health care systems materialize.

The proposed solutions range from better coordination and collaboration models between stakeholders and decision makers at various stages within the bench-to-bedside timeframe to more sophisticated pricing, reimbursement and funding mechanisms as well as effective forms of utilization management to address the inherent complexity of PM.

This session will examine with different strands of these issues with a cross section of stakeholders from different disease areas.


Realising precious therapeutics in neurological disease

Session Organiser: Gianpiero Cavalleri
Ph.D. RCSI Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics (MCT), Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
The opportunity provided by next generation sequencing is revolutionising diagnostics in neurological disease. Today, a molecular diagnosis is possible in a growing proportion of patients. Whilst such a precise diagnosis provides the platform for precision therapeutics, the concept is still very much in its infancy. Realising the promised benefits will take targeted investment and coordination across research groups and health care providers. This session will discuss the barriers and facilitators to the integration of precision therapeutics to the neurology clinic, using epilepsy as a model disease. We will hear from leading clinical and research investigators that are I) driving discovery in the genomics of neurological disease, ii) developing national eHealth systems to facilitate genomics in a clinical setting and iii) actively integrating genomics to their clinical practice.


National Cancer Institute – CCRCB Special Symposium

Session Organiser: Stephan Chanock
Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetic, National Cancer Institute
Nic Orr
Institute of Cancer Research, London


European Cancer Concord Special Symposium: Implementing existing knowledge and innovation – a European Perspective

Session Organiser: Peter Selby
Director of Medical Education, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, UK.
The European Cancer Concord (ECC) is a patient-centered initiative, borne out of the need to deliver an optimal standard of cancer care and research for Europe’s citizens. Strengthening and upholding the rights of the individual cancer patient/cancer survivor are its guiding principles.

The Bill of Rights is underpinned by three key principles: the right of every European citizen to receive accurate information and be involved in their own care; the right of every European citizen to access specialised cancer care underpinned by research and innovation; and the right of every European citizen to cost-effective health systems that ensure optimum cancer outcome. This session will discuss the realisation of these rights.


Oral Abstract Sessions

Oral Abstract Sessions include didactic presentations of abstracts representing important clinical and translational research findings and policy, regulatory developments by topic category. Presenting authors may use PowerPoint slides to accompany their oral presentation. Experts in the field (discussants) are chosen to provide comprehensive themed discussions of the findings from predetermined abstracts.

Poster and Poster Discussion Sessions

Abstracts displayed in poster format; select posters will be chosen for Poster Discussion Sessions where expert discussants will highlight the most clinically applicable and novel posters, with abstract authors participating as panel members. These sessions will be followed by networking with discussants and authors.

29 November

Horizontal Session – 11.00 – 12.45


The All Ireland Genomics Diaspora

Session Organiser: John Grealy
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Eimear Kenny
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai


Preserving Health – what can we do at European Level?

Session Organisers: Tit Albreht,
Coordinator of Cancon Joint Action Institute of Public Health Slovenia,
Sebastian Schmidt
Manager Business Development, Siemens
The Comprehensive Cancer Control Joint Action (CANCON) 2014-2016, will conclude its work at a conference on February 14th – 15th, 2017.  CANCON followed in the steps of the European Partnership on Action Against Cancer (EPAAC) joint action, CANCON aims to further the goal of reducing cancer incidence by 15% by 2020 through a two-pronged approach:
• by identifying key elements and quality standards for comprehensive cancer control in Europe and preparing an evidence-based European guide on quality improvement in comprehensive cancer control;
• and by facilitating cooperation and exchange of best practice between EU countries, to identify and define key elements to ensure optimal, comprehensive cancer care.

With these goals in mind, this session will look at Post-CANCON and the potential that screening can take in the area of preventative care in the era of personalised medicine/healthcare.

Topics covered in the sessions will include:
• Screening and the Innovation Agenda: An Integrated Approach
• Screening Programmes: A Call to Action from the Patients
• The promise of national screening programmes
• Generating alignment in the area of diagnosis: Development of Guidelines
• The Role of ICT& Science to Support Policymakers
• Enabling Quality through Screening: Next Step


Rethinking our approach to tackling Brain Diseases – Integrating Innovation into the healthcare systems

Session Organiser: Giovanni Esposito
European Brain Council (EBC)
The convergence of biological insights from sequencing technologies, machine learning and bioinformatics tools, advancing imaging technologies, and sensors capturing physiological, environmental, and behavioural data are creating new opportunities to advance brain research for individual patients. Fully realizing this potential will require the integration and alignment of multiple stakeholders across the healthcare system. EAPM is organizing a multi-stakeholder personalised medicine-focused panel to address how clinical research can better support delivering the right treatment or prevention to the right patient at the right time for those with various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Disorders of the brain face particular challenges in conducting clinical research due to factors including lack of objective clinical endpoints, the limited number of validated disease specific bio- or imaging- markers, the high impact of placebo effect, and high rate of comorbidities with concomitant therapies. To increase the speed in which personalised medicine discoveries are translated into clinical practice requires appropriately conducted clinical research with input from patients, healthcare providers, regulatory authorities, and policy makers. These stakeholders need to align in establishing the right evidence to facilitate access to personalised treatments addressing the needs of targeted populations and opportunities to prevent these diseases from occurring.


Northern Ireland Clinical Innovation Collaborative Showcase

Session Organiser: Colette Goldrick
APBI


Towards a Canadian Personal Oncology Approach

Session Organiser: Etienne Richer
Associate Director, CIHR Institute of Genetics
Since 2012, more than $240 million in research funding for personalized medicine (PM) has been announced by CIHR and over 110 national and international competition and application partners, most prominently Genome Canada. To date, CIHR has invested $85 million into the PM Strategic Initiative, with a goal of improving clinical health outcomes by evolving from a reactive ‘one size fits all’ approach towards a system of predictive, preventive, and precision care. There have been major innovations, and there are early signs of implementation in certain areas, most notably some specific cancers and rare diseases. Through the presentation of a few success stories in oncology made possible by this strategic funding, participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the approach taken into Canada, in particular aspects pertaining to patients’ involvement and integration of GE3LS within discovery and clinical teams.


Horizontal Session 14.30 – 16.15


HTA, Payers & EMA – Crossing the Rubicon

Session Organiser: Clare Hague
Senior Director, Global Pricing & Market Access, Celgene
Pricing and reimbursement decisions are currently made largely at the time of launch on the basis of evidence from randomised clinical trials. These evaluate merely the average effect of a medicine and set a price for each dose prescribed, irrespective of the effect on individual patients. Since personalised medicines can target narrower populations of patients which are more likely to respond to the treatment, payers should have an interest in pricing and reimbursement models that allow them to pay only for those patients that respond positively to a treatment. But at present, authorities are labouring under uncertainty about how to measure the value of innovative products, and their decisions reflect this.  Early contact between authorities and companies can help build trust on which new approaches can be based.  Pricing and reimbursement authorities often have no mandate to reward innovation, and the  context they operate in usually divorces them from broader considerations of overall healthcare spending.

This session will examine this issue through a series of case studies, Member States example and regional perspective from outside the EU.


Personalised Medicine and Public Health: Two Sides of the Same Coin for Healthcare systems?

Session Organiser: Walter Ricciardi
President of the Instituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy
On Monday December 7, 2015, during the Luxembourg European Union (EU) Presidency, the Council of the EU issued its conclusions on personalised medicine (PM) for patients, highlighting how ‘the development of personalised medicine may offer new opportunities for the treatment of patients in the European Union … allowing healthcare providers to offer better-targeted treatment, avoid medical errors and reduce adverse reactions to medicinal products’ . PM certainly has the potential to improve outcomes for European citizens, but its undoubted promise must be balanced against a number of highly relevant challenges that may limit its positive impact on 21st century medicine. Issues such as increasing costs, inequitable access across European countries and regions and the need for a PM-relevant ethical, regulatory and reimbursement environment are currently undermining PM integration at European and national levels.


Fixing Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR): Targeting therapies which make a difference

Session Organiser: Stuart Elborn
Professor of respiratory Medicine, Imperial College and Royal Brompton Hospital, London and Queens University Belfast
President Obama in his 2015 State of the Union  address used cystis fibrosis as an exemplar of precision Medicine. There are two approved therapies based on a genotype. The following issues will be addressed with a cross section panel of experts:

  • Understanding of a complex aortic regurgitation (AR) disease and  the mutations and dysfunctional proteins and how they cause disease.
  • Understanding of how this knowledge has transformed care and has a rich pipeline of exciting new therapies which are genotype/function specific.
  • Small molecules/Molecular therapies.
  • Use of ex vivo organoids to predict clinical response

Every Prostate cancer is unique: Personalised prostate cancer diagnosis and management

Session Organiser: Hain Van Poppel
Director of Policy, European Patient Forum
David Waugh
Queen’s University Belfast
Prostate cancer management as an example of personalized care. From early detection, over the management of curable disease till the castration resistant stage, the prostate cancer patient deserves an individualized approach.  A focus of the session will be the need of care givers to have access to actually available tools that allow them to correctly identify and position every single prostate cancer patient.  Therefore, this session will introduce the different topics to touch on, by a clinical case, posing the problem through real life case scenario’s with feedback from the audience.

The session will be interactive with a keynote followed by a panel session with an interactive audience component.


UK-India Special Session on Precision Medicine

Session Organiser: Kaisa Immonen
Director of Policy, European Patient Forum

Like many other parts of the world, due to fast-development in sciences such as genomics, personalised medicine is a young but rapidly advancing field of healthcare in India.

Pharmacogenomics-based companies there are part of a new trend, not least because the massive 1.25 billion population of India means that there is a high incidence of genetic disorders.
As we know, pharmacogenomics can offer the elimination of the unpredictable nature of drug development. Meanwhile, we have seen the emergence of new-age diagnostics, based on bio-markers, as we track disease progression and drug response among other things.
Lots of pharmaceutical companies have made significant investments in pharmacogenomics, and scientists in India are busily undertaking pharmacogenomic studies.
India has recently seen a new task force on pharmocogenomics emerge. This seeks to focus on topics including identification of genes, plus conducting research on the development of an ‘Indian pharmacogenomics chip’. Also, there are many well-trained geneticists in the country as a whole.
Culturally, the traditional systems of medicine in India have always been much more customised to individuals, which should help to remove most cultural barriers.
Many Indian patients themselves are suspicious of a one-size-fits-all system of treatment.

Of course, the challenges in India match those found in the EU, UK and, indeed, globally. But the boost in pharmacogenomics everywhere will allow industry to introduce better medicines and companion diagnostic products. The governing bodies have acknowledged the utility of such products; and have, in many cases, guided industry to follow this path in specific instances.
As noted, this has all, of course, been mirrored in the US and Europe generally as well as in the UK individually. In fact the European pharmacogenomics market is the largest revenue generator on the planet, as more healthcare professionals, as well as patients, know about it.

Behind Europe is the US which, of late, has shifted healthcare emphasis away from the one-size-fits-all model to a more personalised approach.


Oral Abstract Sessions

Oral Abstract Sessions include didactic presentations of abstracts representing important clinical and translational research findings and policy, regulatory developments by topic category. Presenting authors may use PowerPoint slides to accompany their oral presentation. Experts in the field (discussants) are chosen to provide comprehensive themed discussions of the findings from predetermined abstracts.

Poster and Poster Discussion Sessions

Abstracts displayed in poster format; select posters will be chosen for Poster Discussion Sessions where expert discussants will highlight the most clinically applicable and novel posters, with abstract authors participating as panel members. These sessions will be followed by networking with discussants and authors.

30 November

Horizontal Sessions 11.00 – 12.45


Eyes do not lie – you are what you can see! Options for personalised medicine in eye diseases for Healthcare Systems

Session Organiser: Alan Stitt
Dean of Innovation & Impact McCauley Chair of Experimental Ophthalmology, Queen’s University Belfast
The main objective of this session is to discuss how personalised diet, lifestyle and drug interventions combined with genetic background interact with disease onset, progression and response to treatment – how the eyes can tell it all.  By the end of the session we will have convinced the audience, that it is imperative that we understand how to tailor our advice when seeing patients with eye diseases as now several factors are known to affect eye disease so personalised medicine is viable once the correct information is gathered and analysed in the appropriate way. Some of the surprising angles, such as gut microbiota and its influence on us as humans, and on eye disease formation will be covered as well where emerging evidence is strong enough now to discuss.

There is a growing body of knowledge and evidence about how eye diseases reflect not only our general health and diet but also our lifestyle and genetic make-up. With the ageing population, age related diseases are becoming more prevalent but also, our desire to provide the best possible vehicle for healthy aging and when required, appropriate care at the right time to each patients grows as well. Without understanding how a particular person’s disease is affected by their genetic make-up and the environmental factors they face during their lifetime, it will not be possible to fulfil the 4 P’s of  personalised medicine: preventative, predictive, personalised and participatory. Using the examples of age related macular degeneration, diabetes, myopia and glaucoma, we will dissect the evidence for personalised medicine and will discuss how these will interact with medications taken for other diseases as well: can we generate progression in one disease by curing another?


Personalizing treatment of blood diseases – Taking advantage of the leukemia/lymphoma genome

Session Organiser Prof. Ulrich Jäger,
Professor of Hematology and Head of the Hematology and Hemostaseology Division at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
Advances in the field of hematology have paved the way to precision medicine in many areas and are essential for development of personalized treatment.  Novel drugs building on the knowledge of the origin of blood disease have changed the prognosis of many patients. The session will  Personalized diagnostics and treatment of leukemia/lymphoma
The objective of the session will be to:

  • Outline the latest discoveries on underlying genetic defects in leukemia/lymphoma
  • Explain the translation of laboratory results to patient treatment

To investigate the role and performance of in vitro diagnostics (CE/IVD vs in-house) with a particular focus on the issued faced by clinical laboratories and of EQA organizations.

Session Organisers: Mario Pazzagli
Professor of Clinical Biochemistry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Biochemical Sciences, University of Florence;
David Barton
Chief Sicentist, Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin
Representative from Clinical laboratories will present on the potential use of in-house tests for new parameters of clinical utility or for confirmatory procedures and representatives from the External quality assessment (EQA) will present an overview of the performances of labs at an european level using in-house or CE/IVD tests.  Attention will be given in the session to the newly  transposed In-Vitro Diagnostics Regulation and its impact on this area.


Horizontal Session 14.30 – 16.15


Enabling Genomic Innovation by supporting human genomics and translational data discovery, access and sharing to impact global medicine and personalised healthcare

Session Organiser: Ewan Birney
Chair Global Alliance for Health
Dr Serena Scollen
Head of Human Genomics and Translational Data, Elixir

Genotypic and phenotypic data underpins all aspects of personalised medicine. Our objective is to demonstrate and discuss value of data re-use and infrastructure (for findable, accessible, interoperable and re-useable data) to support research and health applications. The session will address the following elements through a cross section of stakeholders.

1. Knowledge exchange: ELIXIR and EBI services, Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) for example the European Genome-Phenome Archive and the Beacon project
2. Raising awareness of the existing global and European Initiatives to share data and set standards to reduce fragmentation and build a path towards open public standards


Type 1 diabetes: The future

Session Organiser: Olivier Arnaud
European Director of Research for JDRF
Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is a complex disease that is thought to develop through the interplay of numerous susceptibility and protective genes, acting in concert with negative and positive environmental factors. This session will highlight some of the focus areas for providing tailored prevention, diagnostic and treatment strategies.

The T1D patient population is not homogenous and both the overall relative risk for developing the disease varies, indicating a need for better characterization of the patient types, in order to provide tailored care.

Prevention of progression of the disease into overt type 1 diabetes in high-risk individuals, such as individuals with positive islet autoantibodies in the context of a family history T1D, is an area that offers strong opportunity for personalized treatment. GWAS studies have found over 40 genetic loci, mainly linked to autoimmunity or β-cell survival, have been associated with T1D. These genetic markers are very likely to be key in defining individualized strategies for preventing the progress of the disease as well as defining different strategies and intensities in immunosuppressive preventive therapy, or different approaches to protect transplanted B-cells.

The automimmune β-cell loss that characterizes T1D, is such that essentially all patients eventually require insulin. Insulin replacement options include different types of insulin and the use of injections or infusion pumps, as well as encapsulation of β-cells or stem cells or transplantation of β-cells. All of these approaches provide opportunities for individualizing treatment.


Head and Neck – The Next Frontier

Session Organiser: Lillian L. Siu
MD, FRCPC, Professor, University of Toronto Medical Oncologist, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre Director, Phase I Program BMO Financial Group Chair in Precision Genomics
An overview of the epidemiological and molecular landscape of head and neck squamous cell cancer provides the background of a changing malignancy. This session will focus on the personalized treatment of squamous cell cancer and rare tumours of the head and neck based on current literature and emerging evidence, including novel investigational agents and risk stratified approaches.
The session will cover:

  • Epidemiology and molecular landscape of head and neck squamous cell cancer
  • Investigational treatment of recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer with
  • oncolytic viruses, immune checkpoint inhibitors, and their combinations
  • The rationale of risk stratification approaches in the treatment of locoregionally advanced head and
  • neck squamous cell cancers, including new clinical trials that are being planned or ongoing
  • Current standard systemic treatments for nasopharyngeal and malignant salivary gland tumours
  • and recent clinical trial results in these rare tumours.

The session will examine these issues and the emerging evidence in the epidemiology, molecular characterization and therapeutic options in head and neck cancers enable a personalized approach in the management of these malignancies.


CARERS – Caring And Responsibility in Europe’s Regions

Session Lead: Denis Horgan
Executive Director, European Alliance for Personalised Medicine
The European Parliament has already taken a look at the volunteer sector in Europe, as well as methods to address the low participation of women in the labour market.  In the latter case, it looks to modernise and adapt the current EU legal and policy framework “to allow for parents with children or those with dependent relatives to better balance caring and professional re-sponsibilities”.  As well as looking after children, the facts show that most volunteer health carers (with responsibility for elderly or sick relatives) tend to be women.

The European Parliament argues that there is a strong economic case for supporting the parti-cipation of women-carers in the labour market, both by protective measures and work-life ba-lance policies.  It is vital that the role of carers is given due prominence in today’s society, in which ageing populations put more pressure on EU health systems both financially and in the realm of human resources.
In Europe, one definition of a carer is: “a person who provides unpaid care to someone with a chronic illness, disability or other long lasting health or care need, outside a professional or formal framework”.

The thinking, shared by EAPM, is that there are more than simply financial benefits because, for many patients, being looked after by a dedicated volunteer (whether or not a family mem-ber) can make a huge difference to quality of life, especially in practical situations where a pa-tient on his or her own would struggle to cope.

EAPM, alongside other stakeholders, believes that the role of the voluntary sector in deliver-ing what is essentially one-on-one healthcare needs to be fully recognised, supported and ma-de stronger.   Only with health, social care and voluntary sector services working together can Europe provide adequate care to all who need it, it adds.

The European Parliament  Rapporteurs state that they are “convinced that for reconciling work, private and family life there is no ‘one-size-fits-everyone’ solution, and the appropriate balance has to be found for every person, in order to fit their personal and family’s needs”.

With a multi-stakeholder panel and an interactive session, proposals will be discussed on the way that this can be facilitated.


Oral Abstract Sessions

Oral Abstract Sessions include didactic presentations of abstracts representing important clinical and translational research findings and policy, regulatory developments by topic category. Presenting authors may use PowerPoint slides to accompany their oral presentation. Experts in the field (discussants) are chosen to provide comprehensive themed discussions of the findings from predetermined abstracts.

Poster and Poster Discussion Sessions

Abstracts displayed in poster format; select posters will be chosen for Poster Discussion Sessions where expert discussants will highlight the most clinically applicable and novel posters, with abstract authors participating as panel members. These sessions will be followed by networking with discussants and authors.

In Close Collaboration With Our Partners

Register for EAPM2017

 

Register Now

Abstract Submissions

 

Submit an Abstract